Cairngorms National Park

View to Braemar

Cairngorms National Park welcomes Norwegian delegation

21st September 2012

A delegation from six National Parks in Norway are on a fact-finding mission in Scotland next week (24-26September) to see what they can learn from the Cairngorms National Park.

They’re the latest overseas visitors keen to see how the Scottish model of National Parks is working for the benefit of the economy, the environment and communities.

Scotland’s largest National Park is hosting the visitors – who include the Oppland County Mayor, County Governor and National Park Managers and Board Members – for three days. In that time they’ll not only be shown the spectacular scenery and wildlife but also be given an insight into how the Cairngorms National Park is managed to protect it, as well as promote business and tourism.

The County Governor of Oppland, Kristin Hille Valla said: “We are all very much looking forward to our visit and we are especially interested in finding out more about stakeholder involvement and visitor management in the Cairngorms National Park.”

Like in Scotland, Norway’s National Parks have limited resources and they are keen to see how the Cairngorms National Park has worked with partners very effectively to lever in funding from other sources in order to make things happen, such as path improvements, visitor information centres and training courses.

CNPA Convener Duncan Bryden said: “It is a great honour to welcome such important visitors from Norway’s National Parks. We are very proud of what we have achieved here in the Cairngorms for Park communities and visitors and see this as a great opportunity to share our experience and knowledge. This one of a number of planned visits to the Cairngorms by delegations from other parts of Norway, Sweden and Iceland reflecting international interest in how the National park is managed.

“We’re also keen to learn from our counterparts in Norway what they are doing in their Parks as we have many similarities not just in terms of the landscape but also rural issues such as there being the job opportunities for young people to encourage them to stay and raise families.”